End Academic Entitlement

To the chagrin of some and the relief of others, we will not be at University Prep forever. Our school aims to prepare us for life after high school through rigorous classes, tall expectations and tough exams. However, there is also a culture of flexibility at UPrep — one that allows students to rightfully advocate for themselves, yet also can leave teachers bending over backwards to accommodate student expectations. 

It seems time to work on curbing our expectations for forgiveness on late or half-baked work. Asking for grades to be raised or a deadline to be ignored, or expecting a parent to ask on your behalf, will be unacceptable behavior in college or the workplace. Can you imagine asking your boss for multiple extensions on a report that was due for a meeting? Or having your mom email your college professor to complain about an unfair test grade? 

While UPrep teachers may allow late assignments or offer excessive bonus points to boost grades, your employer or professor simply won’t. Asking UPrep teachers to stretch their already flexible policies to accept tardiness or subpar work shouldn’t be common practice. 

Can you imagine asking your boss for multiple extensions on a report that was due for a meeting? Or having your mom email your college professor to complain about an unfair test grade? ”

This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t talk to your teachers about a grade you don’t feel you deserved. Feedback and discussion are often healthy ways for both teachers and students to improve their work. But in the end, trust your teachers. As an expert in a subject, your teacher’s job is to impart their wisdom. You do not know more about history than a history teacher at UPrep, so why argue about it? 

 Lastly, remind yourself that grades throughout the quarter are typically check-ins about how you’re doing. A C on an English essay might not feel good in the moment, but learning to improve your writing skill will serve you throughout your life. 

So instead of spending time ranting about a bad grade, go into office hours and get extra help, or hit the textbooks a little harder. In the end, you’ll feel prouder about a grade you put in effort for instead of one you negotiated. 

And thank your teachers when you get that A. They work hard for your success, too.